Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop Cabinets

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Shop Cabinets

    Hi Bangshifters; I just thought I would share a little project of mine. It isn't directly related to working on an automobile, but I thought some of you might be interested. I have a lot of junk, and the clutter really bothers me. Recently I built a dyno cell in my shop, and then decided to make some storage cabinets adjacent to the dyno room.

    I kind of sketched out some plans, but just a basic drawing, and wanted to build large lower cabinets that could house completed dyno engines, since I have a lot of engines and they take up a lot of space. The engines also get dusty just sitting around the shop, and that bothers me, so I wanted the cabinets to house the engines, and since they are enclose, they will stay pretty clean. Above these ground level cabinets I wanted a new work bench against the wall, about 16'x3'. Above that, I wanted some cabinets that are recessed to about 18" deep, and then way up top some really big ones that are again 3' deep to swallow parts from disassembled cars that I'm working on. The shop is 12' stud, so those upper cabinets are well out of the way to hold a large amount of parts for a project car until I'm ready for them. On the right side, I wanted a series of 4'x3' cabinets/

    Here is the wall and the start of the project. Along the adjacent wall to the right I started with some boards to define the vertical units on that side.



    Next, I started framing out the design of the cabinets and workbench. I made it pretty strong to handle a lot of weight. Here you can see the units to the right, the workbench, and the beginning of the units over the work bench.



    Here I have the whole thing framed out; there are four units below to house two completed engines each, with the lower cell to the left containing the dyno pumps. On the right side the shallow shelves are made for bellhousings, and will hold twelve bells for various engine types. The upper cabinets are for long term storage of parts from cars that are being worked on, to cut down on the clutter and keep that stuff clean and out of sight.



    Next came the paint and finishing. It really took a long time. I mudded all the faces and sanded it smooth, then primer and paint.



    Next, I made all the doors; there are 30 doors, and one drawer to the left above the dyno pumps. I got lucky and found some cabinet grade hardwood ply for less than half price to make the doors. That stuff is normally crazy expensive. My plan was to fit all the doors then remove them and the hinges, paint, and re-install. The whole project has taken so much time so far I'm just going to keep the doors unfinished for now, since they look okay, and I can't afford to spend much more time messing with this.

    I hope you guys enjoy the tale of my cabinets.
    -dulcich

    Last edited by dulcich; February 26th, 2012, 10:24 PM.

  • #2

    Re: Shop Cabinets

    Put some stainless steel on top of the bench and call it finished. Except throwing big parts into those upper cabinets. I hope you got a ladder around because you ain't no Wilt Chamberlain.


    BTW, they look great.
    BS'er formally known as Rebeldryver

    Resident Instigator

    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Shop Cabinets

      You've missed your calling as a carpenter! What a show-off!

      When it comes to workbenches I've somewhat learned it helps if the benchtop has some 5" overhang over the below cabinets. Otherwise you'll always kicking your feet against the cabinets and bending your back slightly when doing work on the bench.

      Looking very good though.
      You have plenty of areas to put up some good lighting aswell.
      Last edited by BigBlockMopar; February 27th, 2012, 02:33 AM.
      www.BigBlockMopar.com

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Shop Cabinets

        Looks great! I have recently done the same in my shop, but have incorporated pallet racking and the bench is underneath.
        HRPT LH- 09,10,11,12
        DW- 12
        "Stay thirsty my friends"
        The worlds most interesting man

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Shop Cabinets

          you can fill them with car magazines

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Shop Cabinets

            Man, those are nifty. Nice work!
            That which you manifest is before you.

            Comment


            • #7

              Re: Shop Cabinets

              No one likes a show off Dulcich.
              If you can leave two black stripes from the exit of one corner to the braking zone of the next, you have enough horsepower. - Mark Donohue

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Shop Cabinets

                Looks good! I wouldn't worry about the bench and toe room...it's just gonna be a big long parts storage shelf. A guy only needs about 3 square feet of actual work bench.
                My fabulous web page

                "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Shop Cabinets

                  Why do I have to agree with you Jim...
                  Sounds like you speak of some experience in this matter, no?


                  Last edited by BigBlockMopar; February 27th, 2012, 09:13 AM.
                  www.BigBlockMopar.com

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Shop Cabinets

                    NICE WORK! That IS a lot of time and $$ in materials, but worth it in preserving your sanity.

                    Painting shelves / closest is one DIY project I disdain - it takes way way too long - did you spray yours?
                    That's the only way I can see to manage the painful process, with a brush and roller, it's agony.

                    I'll throw this Idea out for ya - quick and pretty easy - scuff and clear coat those doors, even a spray can would work - it will make the grain pop and put a protective coating on them so they won't stain over time - and the contrast to the white would be very pleasing to the eye - don't ya think?

                    Every horizontal surface - including static vehicles - is at high risk for accumulating clutter - my shop is a horible example of that - most guys would really give me a hard time for all the stuff I have piled on top of my '69 mach1! I'm considering using the vertical room in my shop as you have done - get more stuff up high and out of the way.
                    There's always something new to learn.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Shop Cabinets

                      Thanks guys,
                      I was really surprised by how long it took to get this far; I did paint it with brush and roller, and that took forever and was no fun, but I was afraid of overspray if spraying, especially getting up under the front lips of the shelving inside. The finishing and sanding created an unreal amount of dust. Another surprise was the cost of cabinet hardware. The overall cost of the project was probably around 6-700 bucks. I could be off on that, since I never added it all up.

                      I know what you are talking about the toe room, BBM, but I just gave it 2.5" overlap on the front edge of the bench. The benchtop will be handy for laying out parts when testing stuff or tearing down the engine on the dyno. It is also a good place for photography. I will not have any workbenches in the test cell, except for a small folding table.

                      I still plan on a run of steel conduit with a pair of light fixtures above, switches on the right side for the shop lights, and a pair of outlet boxes above the bench. I reinforced one area to mount an extra vice i have. I'm just out of time right now, so this is as far as I'll go for the time being.
                      -dulcich

                      Comment


                      • #12

                        Re: Shop Cabinets

                        Sounds like you speak of some experience in this matter, no?
                        I cleaned off a full 3 square feet of workbench yesterday to build a transmission on....
                        My fabulous web page

                        "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Shop Cabinets

                          Nice job, D. Now that I have a bud in rack shelving biz I'd probably erect rack shelving and box it in to accomplish a similar result but that's just because David takes care of me. Yours certainly came out super.

                          As a retired professional dyno guy I just gotta ask - what did you get? I'm guessing it's an engine dyno but hydrokenetic, Eddy current, DC, or what? Which fixtures (flywheels, engine mounts, etc?). All the gossip!

                          Dan

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Shop Cabinets

                            Nice job, D. Now that I have a bud in rack shelving biz I'd probably erect rack shelving and box it in to accomplish a similar result but that's just because David takes care of me. Yours certainly came out super.

                            As a retired professional dyno guy I just gotta ask - what did you get? I'm guessing it's an engine dyno but hydrokenetic, Eddy current, DC, or what? Which fixtures (flywheels, engine mounts, etc?). All the gossip!

                            Dan
                            The unit is a SuperFlow 902, came with an assortment of flywheels, bells, starters, etc. for common V8's.

                            I'll post up some pics when I've got an engine on it.
                            -dulcich

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Shop Cabinets

                              Cool! That means you can run a Chevy six- 292/250 style. The back of the block is the same as a SBC - bellhousings, clutches, etc.

                              Did you get the Superflow vane-type airflow meters too? They're pretty crude but work great as long as you give them time to catch up - there's a bit of inertia in the vanes. I like having airflow data. Those of you out there who aren't very dyno-literate - the dyno is only as useful as the instrumentation. You can get them to tell you anything if you have the instrumentation systems to make the inquiries. An O2 sensor in each exhaust outlet is great, fuel flow helps a lot, tons of temps tell you a lot - the list goes on. And it all costs big $$ - the faster the sensor, the more $$. As you can probably tell, I'm green with envy!

                              Dan
                              Last edited by DanStokes; February 27th, 2012, 02:51 PM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X